Disease Markers
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Acceptance rate34%
Submission to final decision86 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore2.640
Impact Factor2.761
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A 17-Gene Signature Predicted Prognosis in Renal Cell Carcinoma

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Disease Markers publishes papers related to the identification of disease markers, the elucidation of their role and mechanism, as well as their application in the prognosis, diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

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Disease Markers maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors expert and up-to-date in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

A Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Tandem Repetitive Satellite DNA Sequence as a Molecular Marker for a LAMP Assay for Diagnosing Chagas’ Disease

Chagas’ disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi which is endemic throughout Latin America and is spread by worldwide migration. Diagnosis is currently limited to serological and molecular techniques having variations regarding their sensitivity and specificity. This work was aimed at developing a new sensitive, applicable, and cost-effective molecular diagnosis technique for loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based detection of T. cruzi (Tc-LAMP). The results led to determining a highly homologous satellite repeat region (231 bp) among parasite strains as a molecular marker for diagnosing the disease. Tc-LAMP was performed correctly for detecting parasite DNA (5 fg for the CL Brener strain and 50 fg for the DM28, TcVI, and TcI strains). Assay results proved negative for DNA from 16 helminth species and 7 protozoa, including Leishmania spp. Tc-LAMP based on the highly repeated T. cruzi satellite region is thus proposed as an important alternative for diagnosing T. cruzi infection, overcoming other methods’ limitations such as their analytic capability, speed, and requiring specialized equipment or highly trained personnel. Tc-LAMP could be easily adapted for point-of-care testing in areas having limited resources.

Research Article

A Comprehensive Exploration of the lncRNA CCAT2: A Pan-Cancer Analysis Based on 33 Cancer Types and 13285 Cases

Whether the lncRNA CCAT2 expression level affects the clinical progression and outcome of cancer patients has not yet been fully elucidated. There is still an inconsistent view regarding the correlation between CCAT2 expression and clinicopathological factors, including survival data. Besides, the regulation mechanism of CCAT2 in human cancer is still unclear. Our study analyzed a large number of publication data and TCGA databases to identify the association of CCAT2 expression with clinicopathological factors and to explore the regulatory mechanisms in human cancers. We designed a comprehensive study to determine the expression of CCAT2 in human cancer by designing a meta-analysis of 20 selected studies and the TCGA database, using StataSE 12.0 to explore the relationship between CCAT2 expression and both the prognosis and clinicopathological features of 33 cancer types and 13285 tumor patients. Moreover, we performed GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses on potential target genes of CCAT2 collected from GEPIA and LncRNA2Target V2.0. The level of CCAT2 expression in tumor tissues is higher than that in paired normal tissues and is significantly associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Besides, overexpression of CCAT2 was significantly associated with tumor size, clinical stage, and TNM classification. Meanwhile, CCAT2 expression is the highest in stage II of human cancer, followed by stage III. Finally, 111 validated target gene symbols were identified, and GO and KEGG demonstrated that the CCAT2 validation target was significantly enriched in several pathways, including microRNAs in the cancer pathway. In summary, CCAT2 can be a potential biomarker associated with the progression and prognosis of human cancer.

Research Article

Assessing the Prognostic Performance of the Child-Pugh, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, and Albumin-Bilirubin Scores in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis: A Large Asian Cohort from Gastroenterology Department

Background and Aim. Various methods, including the Child-Pugh score, the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, the MELD combined with serum sodium concentration (MELD-Na) score, the integrated MELD (iMELD) score, and the albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) score, have been widely used for predicting the survival of decompensated cirrhosis (DeCi) patients. In this study, we defined and compared the prognostic value of these scores to predict mortality in DeCi patients. Methods. We performed a single-center, observational retrospective study and analyzed 456 DeCi patients who were hospitalized in the gastroenterology department. The biochemical examination results and demographic characteristics of the patients were obtained, and five scores were calculated upon admission after 24 hours. All patients were observed until death, loss to follow-up, or specific follow-up times (28 days, 90 days, and 6 months). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the ability of these methods to predict mortality in DeCi patients. Results. At 28 days, 90 days, and 6 months, the cumulative number of deaths was 50 (11.0%), 76 (16.6%), and 91 (19.9%), respectively. The scores were significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. All scores yielded viable values in predicting 28-day, 90-day, and 6-month prognoses for DeCi patients. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROCs) of the ALBI score were higher than those of the other scores, which were only over 0.700 at 28 days. The AUROC of the MELD score was higher than that of the other scores, including the MELD-Na and iMELD scores, at 90 days and 6 months. Conclusion. All five methods (Child-Pugh score, MELD score, MELD-Na score, iMELD score, and ALBI score) provided a reliable prediction of mortality for both the short-term and long-term prognosis of patients with DeCi. The ALBI score may be particularly useful for assessing short-term outcomes, whereas the MELD score may be particularly useful for assessing long-term outcomes.

Research Article

Upregulated Seizure-Related 6 Homolog-Like 2 Is a Prognostic Predictor of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Seizure-related 6 homolog-like 2 (SEZ6L2), which is localized on the cell surface, has been found to be associated with tumor angiogenesis and lung cancer progression. However, the role of SEZ6L2 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unclear. We obtained data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) to investigate SEZ6L2 expression and regulation in HCC. Then, HCC tissue samples were collected to verify SEZ6L2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC). Patient information was collected for survival and prognosis analysis. qRT-PCR, IHC, and bioinformatics analysis showed that the SEZ6L2 protein was highly expressed in HCC samples. Clinical data showed that high SEZ6L2 protein expression was correlated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages (), tumor number (), and tumor size (). Meanwhile, SEZ6L2 overexpression was closely associated with poor overall survival and disease-free survival in HCC patients. Moreover, SEZ6L2 is an independent prognostic predictor for the survival of HCC patients. This study suggests a significant correlation between SEZ6L2 and HCC, which means that SEZ6L2 may potentially serve as a useful prognostic biomarker for HCC patients.

Research Article

Prediction of Pleural Invasion in Challenging Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Using Serum and Imaging Markers

Introduction. Preoperative detection of pleural invasion in lung cancer patients is key to curative surgical treatment. We tried to predict pleural invasion in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with <100 ml pleural fluid. Methods. Patients admitted from August 1, 2011, to December 31, 2018, were retrospectively retrieved. Records of serum and imaging markers were analyzed. Results. Among 7004 patients who received surgery, 43 cases with <100 ml pleural fluid who had pleural invasion were included, and another 108 cases without pleural invasion were enrolled as controls. There were no differences in squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) or neuron-specific enolase (NSE) values between the pleural invasion and noninvasion groups ( and 0.14, respectively), but there were significant differences in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) values ( and 0.01, respectively). There were significant differences in the location of original lung cancer (right mid lobe, ), maximum lung lesion diameter (), volume of pleural fluid (nondetectable vs. detectable fluid, ), pleural sign (), and positron emission tomography/computed tomography- (PET/CT-) predicted pleural invasion () between the pleural invasion and noninvasion groups. The maximum Area-Under-the-Curve in the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was achieved with the combination of CEA, CYFRA21-1, detectable pleural fluid, PET/CT prediction, pleural sign, and location of the lung lesion. Conclusions. Serum CEA and CYFRA21-1, location of original lung cancer (right mid lobe), maximum diameter, CT-detectable pleural fluid, pleural sign by CT, and PET/CT-predicted pleural invasion were good markers for the prediction of pleural invasion in non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

Research Article

Diagnostic Accuracy of Holotranscobalamin, Vitamin B12, Methylmalonic Acid, and Homocysteine in Detecting B12 Deficiency in a Large, Mixed Patient Population

Four biomarkers are commonly employed to diagnose B12 deficiency: vitamin B12 (B12), holotranscobalamin (HoloTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and homocysteine (Hcy). 4cB12, a combined index of the B12 status, has been suggested to improve the recognition of B12 deficiency. We aimed to evaluate the four different markers for detecting B12 deficiency, as determined by 4cB12. Within a large, mixed patient population, 11,833 samples had concurrent measurements of B12, HoloTC, MMA, and Hcy. 4cB12 was calculated according to the methods described by Fedosov. Diagnostic cutoffs as well as diagnostic accuracy for the detection of B12 deficiency were assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The median age was 56 years, and women accounted for 58.8% of the samples. Overall, the area under the curve (AUC) for the detection of subclinical B12 deficiency was highest for HoloTC (0.92), followed by MMA (0.91), B12 (0.9) and Hcy (0.78). The difference between HoloTC and B12 was driven by a significantly higher AUC for HoloTC (0.93) than for B12 (0.89), MMA (0.91), and Hcy in women 50 years and older (0.79; for all). In the detection of subclinical B12 deficiency, there were no significant differences in the AUCs of HoloTC, B12, and MMA among men and women <50 years. In conclusion, in years and in men, HoloTC, MMA, or Hcy do not appear superior to B12 for the detection of B12 deficiency. For women 50 years and older, HoloTC seems to be the preferred first-line marker for the detection of subclinical B12 deficiency.

Disease Markers
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate34%
Submission to final decision86 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore2.640
Impact Factor2.761
 Submit