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Disease Markers
Volume 35, Issue 5, Pages 369–387
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/451248
Review Article

Regulation of Breast Cancer and Bone Metastasis by MicroRNAs

Department of Biotechnology, School of Bioengineering, SRM University, Kattankulathur Tamil Nadu, 603 203, India

Received 17 June 2013; Revised 17 August 2013; Accepted 27 August 2013

Academic Editor: Benoit Dugue

Copyright © 2013 S. Vimalraj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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