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Disease Markers
Volume 35, Issue 5, Pages 281–286
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/536521
Review Article

Increased Glutamate and Homocysteine and Decreased Glutamine Levels in Autism: A Review and Strategies for Future Studies of Amino Acids in Autism

1Research Center for Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Received 11 June 2013; Accepted 12 August 2013

Academic Editor: Grant Izmirlian

Copyright © 2013 Ahmad Ghanizadeh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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