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Disease Markers
Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 43–54
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/835876
Review Article

Biomarkers in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview and Implications for Future Research

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Kraepelinstrasse 10, 80804 Munich, Germany

Received 10 March 2013; Accepted 15 April 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Martins-de-Souza

Copyright © 2013 Ulrike Schmidt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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