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Disease Markers
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 124218, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/124218
Review Article

The Use of Functional Genomics in Conjunction with Metabolomics for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Research

School for Physical and Chemical Sciences, Centre for Human Metabonomics, North-West University, Private Bag x6001, Box 269, Potchefstroom 2531, South Africa

Received 20 August 2013; Revised 3 December 2013; Accepted 14 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Andreas Pich

Copyright © 2014 Conrad C. Swanepoel and Du Toit Loots. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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