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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 415160, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/415160
Review Article

Lead Exposure: A Summary of Global Studies and the Need for New Studies from Saudi Arabia

1College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Received 27 May 2014; Accepted 16 July 2014; Published 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: Marco E. M. Peluso

Copyright © 2014 A. P. Shaik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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