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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 643645, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/643645
Research Article

Matrix Metalloproteinase-9: Its Interplay with Angiogenic Factors in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

1Department of Medical Biochemistry, Wroclaw Medical University, Chalubinskiego 10, 50-358 Wroclaw, Poland
2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
3Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw, Poland

Received 23 December 2013; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 31 March 2014

Academic Editor: Silvia Persichilli

Copyright © 2014 Malgorzata Matusiewicz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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