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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 678246, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/678246
Research Article

The CCR5Δ32 Polymorphism in Brazilian Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

1Department of Clinical Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil
2Pernambuco Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, HEMOPE Foundation, 52011-900 Recife, PE, Brazil
3Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, UNICAMP, 13083-878 Campinas, SP, Brazil

Received 2 September 2014; Accepted 23 October 2014; Published 11 November 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Murdaca

Copyright © 2014 Mariana Pezzute Lopes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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