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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 913678, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/913678
Review Article

Two Polymorphisms in the Fractalkine Receptor CX3CR1 Gene Influence the Development of Atherosclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

1Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, 22 Shuangyong Road, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China
2Department of Internal Medicine, Affiliated Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080, China

Received 16 May 2014; Revised 12 July 2014; Accepted 4 August 2014; Published 26 August 2014

Academic Editor: Luisella Bocchio-Chiavetto

Copyright © 2014 Jian Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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