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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 382463, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/382463
Review Article

Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

1Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
2Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA
3Department of Cell Biology, College of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA

Received 8 April 2015; Accepted 16 August 2015

Academic Editor: Evangelos Giannitsis

Copyright © 2015 Jean Charchaflieh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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