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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 382918, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/382918
Review Article

Uric Acid as a Marker of Kidney Disease: Review of the Current Literature

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida, College of Medicine, Orlando, FL 32827, USA
2Orlando VA Medical Center, Orlando, FL 32827, USA

Received 7 April 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Murdaca

Copyright © 2015 Christin Giordano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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