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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 825020, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/825020
Research Article

DNA Repair Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Mitral Chordae Tendineae Rupture

1Department of Medical Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya University, 54290 Sakarya, Turkey
2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya University, 54290 Sakarya, Turkey
3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya University, 54290 Sakarya, Turkey
4Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya University, 54290 Sakarya, Turkey

Received 24 July 2015; Revised 21 September 2015; Accepted 22 September 2015

Academic Editor: Gad Rennert

Copyright © 2015 Aysel Kalayci Yigin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Polymorphisms in Lys939Gln XPC gene may diminish DNA repair capacity, eventually increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance of polymorphism Lys939Gln in XPC gene in patients with mitral chordae tendinea rupture (MCTR). Twenty-one patients with MCTR and thirty-seven age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism was carried out using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR-) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The frequencies of the heterozygote genotype (Lys/Gln-AC) and homozygote genotype (Gln/Gln-CC) were significantly different in MCTR as compared to control group, respectively (52.4% versus 43.2%, ; 38.15% versus 16.2%, ). Homozygote variant (Gln/Gln) genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 2.059; 95% CI: 1.097–3.863; ). Heterozygote variant (Lys/Gln) genotype was also highly significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 1.489; 95% CI: 1.041–2.129; ). The variant allele C was found to be significantly associated with MCTR (OR = 1.481; 95% CI: 1.101–1.992; ). This study has demonstrated the association of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism with MCTR, which is significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR.