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Disease Markers
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 943430, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/943430
Research Article

Metabolic Serum Profiles for Patients Receiving Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Pretransplant Profile Differs for Patients with and without Posttransplant Capillary Leak Syndrome

1Section Hematology, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021 Bergen, Norway
2Section Hematology, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway

Received 29 June 2015; Accepted 1 October 2015

Academic Editor: Donald H. Chace

Copyright © 2015 Håkon Reikvam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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