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Disease Markers
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 952067, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/952067
Research Article

Chemokine Coreceptor-2 Gene Polymorphisms among HIV-1 Infected Individuals in Kenya

Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi 54628, Kenya

Received 16 June 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Murdaca

Copyright © 2015 Dorcas Wachira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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