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Disease Markers
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 964263, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/964263
Research Article

Hyperoxia-Induced Protein Alterations in Renal Rat Tissue: A Quantitative Proteomic Approach to Identify Hyperoxia-Induced Effects in Cellular Signaling Pathways

1Department for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany
2Department for Anaesthesia, Dormagen Hospital, 41540 Dormagen, Germany

Received 1 January 2015; Revised 4 April 2015; Accepted 20 April 2015

Academic Editor: Sunil Hwang

Copyright © 2015 Jochen Hinkelbein et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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