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Disease Markers
Volume 2016, Article ID 8376979, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8376979
Research Article

Is GERD a Factor in Osteonecrosis of the Jaw? Evidence of Pathology Linked to G6PD Deficiency and Sulfomucins

1Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
2Abacus Enterprises, Lummi Island, WA, USA
3Health-e-Iron, LLC, 2800 Waymaker Way, No. 12, Austin, TX 78746, USA
4Iron Disorders Institute, Greenville, SC 29615, USA

Received 11 April 2016; Revised 18 May 2016; Accepted 20 July 2016

Academic Editor: Benedita Sampaio-Maia

Copyright © 2016 Stephanie Seneff et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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