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Disease Markers
Volume 2017, Article ID 1540949, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1540949
Research Article

Relationship between rs854560 PON1 Gene Polymorphism and Tobacco Smoking with Coronary Artery Disease

1Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Medyków Street 18, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
21st Department of Cardiac Surgery/2nd Department of Cardiology, American Heart of Poland, S. A. Armii Krajowej Street 101, 43-316 Bielsko-Biala, Poland
3Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetes and Nephrology, School of Medicine and Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, 3 Maja Street 13-15, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland
4Regional Center of Blood Donation and Blood Treatment in Racibórz, Sienkiewicza Street 3, 47-400 Racibórz, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Joanna Iwanicka; lp.ude.mus@akcinawij

Received 23 June 2017; Revised 25 August 2017; Accepted 14 September 2017; Published 29 September 2017

Academic Editor: Michele Malaguarnera

Copyright © 2017 Joanna Iwanicka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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