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Disease Markers
Volume 2017, Article ID 4191365, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4191365
Research Article

Associations between Interleukin-31 Gene Polymorphisms and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population

1Department of Cardiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
2West China School of Medicine/West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
3Laboratory of Molecular Translational Medicine, Key Laboratory of Obstetric & Gynecology and Pediatric Diseases and Birth Defects of Ministry of Education, West China Institute of Women’s and Children’s Health/West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Li Rao; moc.361@6688iloar

Received 22 January 2017; Revised 4 March 2017; Accepted 28 March 2017; Published 10 May 2017

Academic Editor: Agata M. Bielecka-Dabrowa

Copyright © 2017 Huizi Song et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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