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Disease Markers
Volume 2017, Article ID 5238134, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5238134
Research Article

Structure and Function of Enterocyte in Intrauterine Growth Retarded Pig Neonates

1Department of Physiological Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 100, 02-797 Warsaw, Poland
2Veterinary Research Centre, Department of Large Animal Diseases with Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 100, 02-797 Warsaw, Poland
3Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
4Interdisciplinary Research Center, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Romuald Zabielski; lp.tensulp@iksleibazr

Received 7 April 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 5 July 2017

Academic Editor: Gad Rennert

Copyright © 2017 Karolina Ferenc et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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