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Disease Markers
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5806146, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5806146
Research Article

miR-135b Plays a Neuroprotective Role by Targeting GSK3β in MPP+-Intoxicated SH-SY5Y Cells

Department of Neurology, Huaihe Hospital of Henan University, Kaifeng 475000, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Na Chang

Received 6 January 2017; Revised 7 March 2017; Accepted 8 March 2017; Published 18 April 2017

Academic Editor: Hubertus Himmerich

Copyright © 2017 Jianlei Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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