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Disease Markers
Volume 2018, Article ID 2358451, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2358451
Research Article

S100B, Homocysteine, Vitamin B12, Folic Acid, and Procalcitonin Serum Levels in Remitters to Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Pilot Study

1Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
2Center for Systems Neuroscience, Hannover, Germany
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Hannah Maier; ed.revonnah-hm@hannah.reiam

Received 21 August 2017; Accepted 29 November 2017; Published 10 January 2018

Academic Editor: Hubertus Himmerich

Copyright © 2018 Hannah Maier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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