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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 790234, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/790234
Review Article

Cellular and Molecular Characteristics of Scarless versus Fibrotic Wound Healing

1Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Allegheny General Hospital, 320 East North Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, USA
2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, USA

Received 27 March 2010; Accepted 24 November 2010

Academic Editor: Hayes B. Gladstone

Copyright © 2010 Latha Satish and Sandeep Kathju. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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