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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 156068, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/156068
Review Article

Biomarkers as Key Contributors in Treating Malignant Melanoma Metastases

Pharmacology Department, Federal University of São Paulo, 04039-032 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 12 May 2011; Accepted 17 August 2011

Academic Editor: Gérald E. Piérard

Copyright © 2012 Camila Ferreira de Souza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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