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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 736957, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/736957
Research Article

The Preliminary Study of Effects of Tolfenamic Acid on Cell Proliferation, Cell Apoptosis, and Intracellular Collagen Deposition in Keloid Fibroblasts In Vitro

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH 45435, USA

Received 30 May 2014; Revised 28 August 2014; Accepted 28 August 2014; Published 22 September 2014

Academic Editor: Lajos Kemény

Copyright © 2014 Dan Yi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Keloid scarring is a fibroproliferative disorder due to the accumulation of collagen type I. Tolfenamic acid (TA), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been found to potentially affect the synthesis of collagen in rats. In this preliminary study, we aimed to test the effects of TA on cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and the deposition of intracellular collagen in keloid fibroblasts. Normal fibroblasts (NFs) and keloid fibroblasts (KFs) were obtained from human dermis tissue. Within the dose range 10−3–10−6 M and exposure times 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, we found that 0.55 × 10−3 M TA at 48 h exposure exhibited significantly decreased cell proliferation in both NFs and KFs. Under these experimental conditions, we demonstrated that (1) TA treatment induced a remarkable apoptotic rate in KFs compared to NFs; (2) TA treatment reduced collagen production in KFs versus NFs; (3) TA treatment decreased collagen type I expression in KFs comparing to that of NFs. In summary, our data suggest that TA decreases cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, and inhibits collagen accumulation in KFs.