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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 140194, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/140194
Clinical Study

The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

1Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Addictions, Hospital del Mar, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital General Granollers Benito Menni CASM, 08400 Granollers, Barcelona, Spain
3Statistics and Operation Research Department, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
4Psychiatry Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain

Received 22 January 2011; Revised 3 April 2011; Accepted 14 April 2011

Academic Editor: Verinder Sharma

Copyright © 2011 Luis M. Martín-López et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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