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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 564396, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/564396
Research Article

More Similar than Different? Exploring Cultural Models of Depression among Latino Immigrants in Florida

1Department of Aging & Mental Health Disparities, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevord, MHC 1438, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, USA
2Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, SOC 107, Tampa, FL 33620-8100, USA
3Department of Mental Health Law and Policy, Florida Mental Health Institute, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, USA
4Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling, Florida Mental Health Institute, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, USA
5School of Social Work MGY 132, College of Behavioral Community Sciences, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620-8100, USA

Received 1 April 2011; Revised 31 May 2011; Accepted 22 June 2011

Academic Editor: Jodi Gonzalez

Copyright © 2011 Dinorah (Dina) Martinez Tyson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The Surgeon General's report, “Culture, Race, and Ethnicity: A Supplement to Mental Health,” points to the need for subgroup specific mental health research that explores the cultural variation and heterogeneity of the Latino population. Guided by cognitive anthropological theories of culture, we utilized ethnographic interviewing techniques to explore cultural models of depression among foreign-born Mexican (n=30), Cuban (n=30), Columbian (n=30), and island-born Puerto Ricans (n=30), who represent the largest Latino groups in Florida. Results indicate that Colombian, Cuban, Mexican, and Puerto Rican immigrants showed strong intragroup consensus in their models of depression causality, symptoms, and treatment. We found more agreement than disagreement among all four groups regarding core descriptions of depression, which was largely unexpected but can potentially be explained by their common immigrant experiences. Findings expand our understanding about Latino subgroup similarities and differences in their conceptualization of depression and can be used to inform the adaptation of culturally relevant interventions in order to better serve Latino immigrant communities.