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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 865679, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/865679
Research Article

Gender Differences in Depression: Assessing Mediational Effects of Overt Behaviors and Environmental Reward through Daily Diary Monitoring

Department of Psychology, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 307 Austin Peay Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0900, USA

Received 14 November 2011; Accepted 4 December 2011

Academic Editor: H. Grunze

Copyright © 2012 Marlena M. Ryba and Derek R. Hopko. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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