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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 582380, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/582380
Research Article

Leukocyte Gene Expression in Patients with Medication Refractory Depression before and after Treatment with ECT or Isoflurane Anesthesia: A Pilot Study

1Department of Anesthesiology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
2Neuroscience Program, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
3Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
4Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 22 March 2014; Published 13 April 2014

Academic Editor: Michael Berk

Copyright © 2014 E. Iacob et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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