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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 627863, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/627863
Clinical Study

Does Duloxetine Improve Cognitive Function Independently of Its Antidepressant Effect in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Subjective Reports of Cognitive Dysfunction?

Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9119, USA

Received 27 June 2013; Revised 14 October 2013; Accepted 15 October 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editor: Yvonne Forsell

Copyright © 2014 Tracy L. Greer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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