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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1598130, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1598130
Review Article

A Possible Role of Anhedonia as Common Substrate for Depression and Anxiety

Via Ragazzi del 99, No. 45, 20010 San Giorgio su Legnano, Italy

Received 17 October 2015; Revised 30 January 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Wai-Kwong Tang

Copyright © 2016 Luigi Grillo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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