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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2017, Article ID 9109086, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9109086
Research Article

Addressing Adolescent Depression in Tanzania: Positive Primary Care Workforce Outcomes Using a Training Cascade Model

1Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre, 5850 University Avenue, P.O. Box 9700, Halifax, NS, Canada B3K 6R8
2Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health, Dalhousie University and IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada
3Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health Team, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada
4Farm Radio International, Ottawa, ON, Canada
5Muhimbili National Hospital, Kalenga Street, P.O. Box 65000, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
6Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 65001, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
7Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 9083, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
8Non-Communicable Disease, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 9083, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Correspondence should be addressed to Stan Kutcher; ac.htlaehsn.kwi@rehctuk.yelnats

Received 11 January 2017; Revised 15 May 2017; Accepted 26 July 2017; Published 26 November 2017

Academic Editor: Bernard Sabbe

Copyright © 2017 Stan Kutcher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. This is a report on the outcomes of a training program for community clinic healthcare providers in identification, diagnosis, and treatment of adolescent Depression in Tanzania using a training cascade model. Methods. Lead trainers adapted a Canadian certified adolescent Depression program for use in Tanzania to train clinic healthcare providers in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of Depression in young people. As part of this training program, the knowledge, attitudes, and a number of other outcomes pertaining to healthcare providers and healthcare practice were assessed. Results. The program significantly, substantially, and sustainably improved provider knowledge and confidence. Further, healthcare providers’ personal help-seeking efficacy also significantly increased as well as the clinicians’ reported number of adolescent patients identified, diagnosed, and treated for Depression. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting positive outcomes of a training program addressing adolescent Depression in Tanzanian community clinics. These results suggest that the application of this training cascade approach may be a feasible model for developing the capacity of healthcare providers to address youth Depression in a low-income, low-resource setting.