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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2018, Article ID 1537371, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1537371
Research Article

Anxiolytic and Antidepressant Effects of Maerua angolensis DC. Stem Bark Extract in Mice

1Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
3Department of Pharmacology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Central University, Ghana
5Department of Pharmacognosy and Herbal Medicine, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Charles Kwaku Benneh; hg.ude.sahu@hennebkc

Received 30 March 2018; Revised 13 June 2018; Accepted 5 July 2018; Published 9 September 2018

Academic Editor: Janusz K. Rybakowski

Copyright © 2018 Charles Kwaku Benneh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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