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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2018, Article ID 5304759, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5304759
Research Article

S100B Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Co-Occurring Depressive Symptoms

1Diabetes Center, First Department of Propaedeutic and Internal Medicine, Laiko General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University, Medical School, Athens, Greece
2Laboratory of Experimental Surgery and Surgical Research N.S. Christeas, National and Kapodistrian University, Medical School, Athens, Greece
3Heart Failure Unit, Department of Cardiology, Attikon University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 1 Rimini St, 12462, Athens, Greece
4Department of Endocrinology, Nikaia General Hospital, Greece
5Mental Health Center, G. Gennimatas General Hospital, Athens, Greece
6First Department of Psychiatry, Eginition Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Vassilissis Sofias Ave 72-74, 11528, Athens, Greece

Correspondence should be addressed to Panagiota Katsanou; rg.oohay@uonastakp

Received 28 April 2018; Revised 4 October 2018; Accepted 19 October 2018; Published 18 November 2018

Academic Editor: Janusz K. Rybakowski

Copyright © 2018 Panagiota Katsanou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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