Depression Research and Treatment

Religious and Spiritual Factors in Depression


Publishing date
03 Aug 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
03 Feb 2012

1Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA

2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

3Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA

4Sigmund Freud Privatuniversitat Wien, Vienna, Austria

5Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran


Religious and Spiritual Factors in Depression

Description

This special issue focuses on the role that religious/spiritual factors play in the etiology, course, and treatment of depression. Given the worldwide prevalence of religious beliefs and activities and the influence they might play in the development and course of depressive disorders, clinicians and researchers need to be aware of research and current discussions on the relationships between religion/spirituality and emotional disorders. In the United States, nearly two thirds of the population indicates that religion is an important part of daily life, and many more report that spiritual factors are influential. After the September 11th terrorist attacks, 90% of Americans turned to religion to cope with the stress and anxiety of these attacks (NEJM, 2001; 345:1507-1512). A recent systematic review of quantitative research on religion, spirituality, and depression identified 444 studies that had examined these relationships; 61% of those studies reported inverse relationships between religiosity/spirituality and depression, whereas 6% reported positive relationships (Handbook of Religion & Health, 2011, Oxford University Press). Studies are now in the field examining the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapies for depression that utilize and integrate the religious and spiritual resources of patients in treatment. The present special issue will contain review articles, commentaries, and, in particular, original research on relationships between religion/spirituality and depression, and these papers will be sought from scientists around the globe. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Relationships between religion, spirituality, and depression
  • Relationships between religion, spirituality, and depression, preferably a prospective study
  • The roles that different religious faith traditions may play in the prevention or exacerbation of depression in different cultures
  • Religious versus conventional CBT in the treatment of depression, either a report of original data from a completed study or a description of an ongoing clinical trial focused on this comparison
  • Spiritually integrated intervention (not CBT) used for the treatment of depression/anxiety
  • The interaction that religious involvement may have with either biological treatments (medication, ECT) or psychotherapy for depression
  • How religious beliefs may exacerbate depression and prolong its course by worsening guilt and increasing anxiety
  • How religious communities may discourage the use of antidepressants or psychotherapy and may condemn members for being depressed
  • The spiritual assessment process in patients with depression/anxiety
  • How to educate mental health professionals on the negative and positive effects on depression that religious involvement may have

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/drt/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 298056
  • - Editorial

Religious and Spiritual Factors in Depression

Sasan Vasegh | David H. Rosmarin | ... | Raphael M. Bonelli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 962860
  • - Review Article

Religious and Spiritual Factors in Depression: Review and Integration of the Research

Raphael Bonelli | Rachel E. Dew | ... | Sasan Vasegh
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 754031
  • - Research Article

Late-Life Depressive Symptoms, Religiousness, and Mood in the Last Week of Life

Arjan W. Braam | Marianne Klinkenberg | ... | Dorly J. H. Deeg
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 742410
  • - Research Article

A Pilot Survey of Clergy Regarding Mental Health Care for Children

Leigh Blalock | Rachel E. Dew
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 425463
  • - Research Article

Influence of Spirituality on Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Suicidality in Active Duty Military Personnel

Laurel L. Hourani | Jason Williams | ... | Robert M. Bray
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 460419
  • - Research Article

Religious versus Conventional Psychotherapy for Major Depression in Patients with Chronic Medical Illness: Rationale, Methods, and Preliminary Results

Harold G. Koenig
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 267820
  • - Research Article

Prospective Associations between Religiousness/Spirituality and Depression and Mediating Effects of Forgiveness in a Nationally Representative Sample of United States Adults

Loren L. Toussaint | Justin C. Marschall | David R. Williams
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 396347
  • - Research Article

Does Death of a Family Member Moderate the Relationship between Religious Attendance and Depressive Symptoms? The HUNT Study, Norway

Torgeir Sørensen | Lars J. Danbolt | ... | Lars Lien
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 124370
  • - Review Article

Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

John R. Peteet
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 745970
  • - Research Article

Longitudinal Relationships of Religion with Posttreatment Depression Severity in Older Psychiatric Patients: Evidence of Direct and Indirect Effects

R. David Hayward | Amy D. Owen | ... | Martha E. Payne
Depression Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision72 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.090
Impact Factor-
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