Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate27%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication33 days
CiteScore3.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor2.629

Alkannin Inhibits the Development of Ovarian Cancer by Affecting miR-4461

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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine seeks to apply scientific rigor to the study of complementary and alternative medicine, emphasizing on health outcome, while documenting biological mechanisms of action.

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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Review Article

Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine Plays a Role in the Liver, Kidney, and Intestine to Ameliorate Hyperuricemia according to Experimental Studies

In the last few decades, hyperuricemia has drawn increasing attention owing to its global prevalence. Observational surveys have manifested that there is a relation between hyperuricemia and increased risks of hypertension, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular events, metabolic disorders, end stage renal disease, and mortality. As alternatives, Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs have demonstrated concrete effects in mitigating hyperuricemia in different experiments. Researchers have made efforts to investigate the role of herbal medicine in attenuating hyperuricemia. This review focuses on traditional Chinese herbal medicines that have been reported to ameliorate hyperuricemia in experimental studies.

Research Article

Combined Metabolomics and Network Toxicology to Explore the Molecular Mechanism of Phytolacca acinose Roxb-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish Larvae in Vivo

Phytolacca acinosa Roxb (PAR), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used as a diuretic drug for a long period of time for the treatment edema, swelling, and sores. However, it has been reported that PAR might induce hepatotoxicity, while the mechanisms of its toxic effect are still unclear. In this study, network toxicology and metabolomic technique were applied to explore PAR-induced hepatotoxicity on zebrafish larvae. We evaluated the effect of PAR on the ultrastructure and the function of the liver, predictive targets, and pathways in network toxicology, apoptosis of liver cells by PCR and western blot, and metabolic profile by GC-MS. PAR causes liver injury, abnormal liver function, and apoptosis in zebrafish. The level of arachidonic acid in endogenous metabolites treated with PAR was significantly increased, leading to oxidative stress in vivo. Excessive ROS further activated the p53 signal pathway and caspase family, which were obtained from KEGG enrichment analysis of network toxicology. The gene levels of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were significantly increased by RT-PCR, and the level of Caps3 protein was also significantly up-regulated through western blot. PAR exposure results in the liver function abnormal amino acid metabolism disturbance and motivates hepatocyte apoptosis, furthermore leading to liver injury.

Review Article

A Meta-Analysis: Whether Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Dysfunction Caused by Stroke with Lower Limb Spasticity

Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in improving lower limb spasticity after stroke. Methods. The PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Biology Medicine (CBM) disc, China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP), and Wanfang databases were searched online from their inception to May 2021 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for lower extremity spasticity after stroke. Valid data were extracted from the included literature, and the quality evaluation was conducted with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions along with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale (PE-Dro scale). The data that met the quality requirements were systematically analysed using Review Manager 5.4 software. Results. A total of 554 patients from seven articles (nine studies) were quantitatively analysed. Outcomes included the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Fugl–Meyer Assessment of Lower Extremity (FMA-LE), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), and Timed Up and Go (TUG), measured as the effect of rTMS compared with controls conditions after treatment. The systematic review showed that rTMS reduced MAS and increased MBI scores, respectively (SMD = −0.24, 95% CI [−0.45, −0.03],  = 0.02; MD = 6.14, 95% CI [−3.93,8.35],  < 0.00001), compared with control conditions. Low-frequency rTMS (LF-rTMS) significantly improved FMA-LE scores (SMD = 0.32, 95% CI [0.13, 0.51],  = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in FMA-LE scores when using high-frequency rTMS (HF-rTMS) (> 0.1) and in TUG times ( > 0.1) between the treatment and control groups. Conclusions. rTMS was effective in improving spasticity and activities of daily living. LF-rTMS has positive clinical effects on enhancing motor function in patients who experience lower extremity spasticity after stroke. To better validate the above conclusions, more multicentre, high-quality, and double-blind randomized controlled trials are needed.

Research Article

Hemoglobin Precipitation: An Index of In Vitro Vasoconstrictive Activities of Methanol Leaf Extracts of Croton megalocarpus Hutch and Lantana camara Linn

The function of innate hemostasis aids the body in bleeding control, preventing the loss of excessive amounts of blood following low-degree injuries. However, injuries of a higher degree may require extrinsic intervention to stop life-threatening blood loss. Astringent agents’ actions result in mechanical constriction of small blood vessels and shrinkage of body tissues, thereby stopping blood loss. This enhances the primary phase of hemostasis, where vasoconstriction is the main mechanism at play during the initial response to injury. The effects of plant extracts on protein precipitation have been linked to blood vessel vasoconstriction. Traditionally, the leaves of Croton megalocarpus Hutch and Lantana camara Linn plants are used by communities living in Makueni County, Kenya, for peripheral bleeding control. However, the effects of extracts of both plants on hemoglobin precipitation have not been evaluated scientifically. In the current study, the activities of methanol extracts of C. megalocarpus (H.) and L. camara (L.) on blood protein precipitation were investigated. The leaves were harvested, cleaned, air-dried, milled, and extracted in absolute methanol before being concentrated into dry powders. A qualitative phytochemical screen revealed the presence of terpenoids, steroids, tannins, phenols, flavonoids, reducing sugars, cardiac glycosides, and carbohydrates in the methanol extract of C. megalocarpus (H.). The methanol extracts of L. camara (L.) contained cardiac glycosides, saponins, tannins, phenols, terpenoids, reducing sugars, and carbohydrates. The hemoglobin precipitation ability of various concentrations of extracts using mice samples was presented as relative astringency following the tannic acid external standard method. Methanol extracts C. megalocarpus (H.) and L. camara (L.) had significantly higher relative astringency compared with the normal control, indicating a protein precipitating activity. The relative astringency observed in both plant extracts is linked to the activity of tannins, phenols, flavonoids, and saponins detected during preliminary phytochemical screening.

Research Article

Exploring the Antiglioma Mechanisms of Luteolin Based on Network Pharmacology and Experimental Verification

Luteolin, a natural flavone compound, exists in a variety of fruits and vegetables, and its anticancer effect has been shown in many studies. However, its use in glioma treatment is hampered due to the fact that the underlying mechanism of action has not been fully explored. Therefore, we elucidated the potential antiglioma targets and pathways of luteolin systematically with the help of network pharmacology and molecular docking technology. The druggability of luteolin, including absorption, excretion, distribution, and metabolism, was assessed via the Traditional Chinese Medicine Systems Pharmacology Database and Analysis Platform (TCMSP). The potential targets of luteolin and glioma were extracted from public databases, and the intersecting targets between luteolin and glioma were integrated and visualized by a Venn diagram. In addition, GO and KEGG pathway analysis was engaged in Metascape. The network of the luteolin-target-pathway was visualized by Cytoscape. Ultimately, the interactions between luteolin and predicted key targets were confirmed by Discovery studio software. According to the ADME results, luteolin shows great potential for development into a drug. 4860 glioma-associated targets and 280 targets of luteolin were identified, of which 205 were intersection targets. 6 core targets of luteolin against glioma, including AKT1, JUN, ALB, MAPK3, MAPK1, and TNF, were identified via PPI network analysis of which AKT1, JUN, ALB, MAPK1, and TNF harbor diagnostic value. The biological processes of luteolin are mainly involved in the response to inorganic substances, response to oxidative stress, and apoptotic signaling pathway. The essential pathways of luteolin against glioma involve pathways in cancer, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, the TNF signaling pathway, and more. Meanwhile, luteolin’s interaction with six core targets was verified by molecular docking simulation and its antiglioma effect was verified by in vitro experiments. This study suggests that luteolin has a promising potential for development into a drug and, moreover, it displays preventive effects against glioma by targeting various genes and pathways.

Research Article

Development of an Innovative Berberine Food-Grade Formulation with an Ameliorated Absorption: In Vitro Evidence Confirmed by Healthy Human Volunteers Pharmacokinetic Study

Objective. To evaluate in vitro solubility, bioaccessibility, and cytotoxic profile, together with a pharmacokinetic profile by oral administration to healthy volunteers of a novel food-grade berberine formulation (BBR-PP, i.e., berberine Phytosome®). Results. An in vitro increase of solubility in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids and an improved bioaccessibility at intestinal level along with a lower cytotoxicity with respect to berberine were observed with BBR-PP. The pharmacokinetic profile of the oral administration to healthy volunteers confirmed that berberine Phytosome® significantly ameliorated berberine absorption, in comparison to unformulated berberine, without any observed side effects. The berberine plasma concentrations observed with both doses of BBR-PP were significantly higher than those seen after unformulated berberine administration, starting from 45 min (free berberine) and 30 min (total berberine). Furthermore, BBR-PP improved berberine bioavailability (AUC) was significantly higher, around 10 times on molar basis and with observed dose linearity, compared to the unformulated berberine. Conclusion. These findings open new perspectives on the use of this healthy berberine formulation in metabolic discomforts.

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate27%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication33 days
CiteScore3.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor2.629
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.