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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 120820, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep144
Original Article

Antinociceptive Activity of Trichilia catigua Hydroalcoholic Extract: New Evidence on Its Dopaminergic Effects

1Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil
2Faculty of Pharmacy, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil
4Pianowski and Pianowski Consulting, Brazil
5Faculty of Dentistry, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 7 February 2009; Accepted 29 August 2009

Copyright © 2011 Alice F. Viana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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