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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 132374, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep088
Original Article

S-Petasin, the Main Sesquiterpene of Petasites formosanus, Inhibits Phosphodiesterase Activity and Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness

1Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
3Department of Medical Technology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
4National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

Received 30 March 2009; Accepted 15 June 2009

Copyright © 2011 Chung-Hung Shih et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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