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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 179876, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep134
Original Article

Animal-Based Remedies as Complementary Medicines in the Semi-Arid Region of Northeastern Brazil

1Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, Avenida das Baraúnas, Campina Grande, Paraíba 58109-753, Brazil
2Mestrado em Ciência e Tecnologia Ambiental, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, Avenida das Baraúnas, Campina Grande, Paraíba 58109-753, Brazil
3Pós-Graduação em Desenvolvimento e Meio Ambiente (PRODEMA), Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, Avenida das Baraúnas, Campina Grande, Paraíba 58109-753, Brazil

Received 6 February 2009; Accepted 3 August 2009

Copyright © 2011 Rômulo R. N. Alves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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