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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 185913, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep231
Original Article

Preventive Effect of Pine Bark Extract (Flavangenol) on Metabolic Disease in Western Diet-Loaded Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes Mice

1Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, Shinmachi Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585, Japan
2Department of clinical pharmacy, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi Kanazawa-shi, Ishikawa, Japan
3Tomei Atsugi Hospital, Atsugi City, Kanagawa, Japan
4Toyo Shinyaku Co., Ltd, Tosu-Shi, Saga, Japan

Received 10 August 2009; Accepted 1 December 2009

Copyright © 2011 Tsutomu Shimada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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