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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 250708, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/neq072
Original Article

The Impact of Group Drumming on Social-Emotional Behavior in Low-Income Children

1Pediatric Pain Program, Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
2Clinical Science Program, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA

Received 10 August 2009; Accepted 19 May 2010

Copyright © 2011 Ping Ho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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