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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 286320, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep084
Original Article

Modulation of Signal Proteins: A Plausible Mechanism to Explain How a Potentized Drug Secale Cor 30C Diluted beyond Avogadro's Limit Combats Skin Papilloma in Mice

1Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal, India
2Boiron Laboratory, Lyon, France

Received 24 February 2009; Accepted 28 May 2009

Copyright © 2011 Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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