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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 348686, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/348686
Research Article

Effect of Hachimijiogan against Renal Dysfunction and Involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α in the Remnant Kidney Model

1Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Graduate school of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
2Division of Pathogenic Biochemistry, Institute of Natural Medicine, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
3Department of Kampo Diagnostics, Institute of Natural Medicine, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
4Biomedical Institute, NPO Primate Agora, Inuyama, Aichi 484-0002, Japan
5Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
6Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

Received 2 November 2010; Accepted 7 January 2011

Copyright © 2011 Hiroshi Oka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In chronic renal failure, hypoxia of renal tissue is thought to be the common final pathway leading to end-stage renal failure. In this study the effects of hachimijiogan, a Kampo formula, were studied with respect to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Using remnant kidney rats, we studied the effects of hachimijiogan on renal function in comparison with angiotensin II receptor blocker. The result showed that oral administration of hachimijiogan for seven days suppressed urinary protein excretion and urinary 8-OHdG, a marker of antioxidant activity, equally as well as oral administration of candesartan cilexetil. In contrast, the protein volume of HIF-1α in the renal cortex was not increased in the candesartan cilexetil group, but that in the hachimijiogan group was increased. In immunohistochemical studies as well, the expression of HIF-1α of the high-dose hachimijiogan group increased compared to that of the control group. Vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter 1, target genes of HIF-1α, were also increased in the hachimijiogan group. These results suggest that hachimijiogan produces a protective effect by a mechanism different from that of candesartan cilexetil.