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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 543648, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep198
Original Article

An Herbal Nasal Drop Enhanced Frontal and Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activity

1Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong
2Integrative Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Center, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3Henan Songshan Research Institute for Chanwuyi, Hong Kong
4Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Received 14 May 2009; Accepted 26 October 2009

Copyright © 2011 Agnes S. Chan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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