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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 607637, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep154
Review Article

Methodological Problems in fMRI Studies on Acupuncture: A Critical Review with Special Emphasis on Visual and Auditory Cortex Activations

1Brain Imaging Center, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Neuroradiology, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528 Frankfurt, Germany
2Institute of Neuroradiology, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany
3Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany
4Department of Neurology, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany

Received 17 June 2009; Accepted 30 August 2009

Copyright © 2011 Florian Beissner and Christian Henke. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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