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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 687349, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nen044
Original Article

GP Participation and Recruitment of Patients to RCTs: Lessons from Trials of Acupuncture and Exercise for Low Back Pain in Primary Care

1Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK
2Medical Care Research Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
3School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
4Foundation for Traditional Chinese Medicine, York, UK

Received 16 October 2007; Accepted 27 May 2008

Copyright © 2011 Sally E. M. Bell-Syer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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