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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 810908, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/810908
Research Article

Information Resource Needs and Preference of Queensland General Practitioners on Complementary Medicines: Result of a Needs Assessment

1Discipline of General Practice, University of QLD 4029, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
2Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
3NatMed-Research Unit, Research Cluster for Health and Wellbeing, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia
4Medical Education Services Australia (MESA), Notting Hill, VIC, Australia

Received 5 December 2010; Accepted 8 February 2011

Copyright © 2011 Tina Janamian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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