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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 932430, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep169
Original Article

Diaphragmatic Breathing Reduces Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

Department of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, University of Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 62032 Camerino, Macerata, Italy

Received 31 March 2009; Accepted 2 October 2009

Copyright © 2011 Daniele Martarelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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