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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 950461, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/neq039
Original Article

Stress Biomarkers in Medical Students Participating in a Mind Body Medicine Skills Program

1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA
2Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA
3Department of Mathematics, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA
4Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA
5Department of Psychiatry, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA

Received 8 July 2009; Accepted 9 April 2010

Copyright © 2011 Brian W. MacLaughlin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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