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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 957506, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/957506
Research Article

A Grounded Theory Study of Homeopathic Practitioners' Perceptions and Experiences of the Homeopathic Consultation

Department of Primary Care, University of Southampton, Hampshire SD17 1BJ, UK

Received 21 July 2010; Accepted 1 September 2010

Copyright © 2011 Caroline Eyles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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