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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 984965, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep063
Review Article

The Role of Th17 in Neuroimmune Disorders: Target for CAM Therapy. Part II

Immunosciences Lab., Inc., Los Angeles, CA 90035, USA

Received 28 November 2008; Accepted 22 May 2009

Copyright © 2011 Aristo Vojdani and Jama Lambert. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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